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JCACS Musings
Musings on issues in education, from the Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies. https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs.
Photograph courtesy of Stephanie Bartlett

Stephanie Bartlett

Beginning from the assumption that we must learn to wonder as we wander, our writing here aims to advance theory and practice as they relate to walking. We understand walking as both an intentional physical activity and a curricular understanding of traversing with and through landscapes of topical relations in attunement with the Earth. (Lyle, Latremouille, & Jardine, 2021, p. 1).

The opening editorial for this JCACS Special Issue Walking: Attuning to an Earthly Curriculum calls out to curriculum scholars and educators to “learn to wonder as we wander” (Lyle, Latremouille, & Jardine, 2021, p. 1). This piece…


Photograph courtesy of Stephanie Bartlett

Stephanie Bartlett

Beginning from the assumption that we must learn to wonder as we wander, our writing here aims to advance theory and practice as they relate to walking. We understand walking as both an intentional physical activity and a curricular understanding of traversing with and through landscapes of topical relations in attunement with the Earth. (Lyle, Latremouille, & Jardine, 2021, p. 1).

The opening editorial for this JCACS Special Issue Walking: Attuning to an Earthly Curriculum calls out to curriculum scholars and educators to “learn to wonder as we wander” (Lyle, Latremouille, & Jardine, 2021, p. 1). This piece…


Rollerblading over the Past: A Deconstruction of a Sociohistorical City Space


Tanjin Ashraf

photograph courtesy of Pixabay

I still remember one of my presentations from a few years ago when I was a Master of Education student. Sitting in discomfort, I presented a review of Richard Tabulawa’s (2003) International aid agencies, learner-centered pedagogy and political democratization: A critique, while articulating the dissonance I felt on my perception of democracy.

In a nutshell, Tabulawa (2003) asserts that aid agencies, such as the World Bank or UNICEF, are more likely to provide funding to a nation if its education system implements learner-centered pedagogies, which are teaching practices that center the students as active participants in their learning…


Photograph courtesy of Kyle Glenn, Unsplash.com

Shuyuan Liu

Teaching democracy requires an understanding of what democracy is. While this is a comprehensive topic, I raise the question “What is the opposite of democracy?” The neoliberal ideology that prevails in the global English education market represents the sacrifice of democracy in education. Neoliberalism is described by Harvey (2005) as “first and foremost a political project devised by the corporate capitalist class towards the late 1960s and the early 1970s to consolidate class power.” The corporate capitalist class then brought the capital to the labor force by pushing for globalization. Globalization has since spawned the realization that this…


Stephanie Bartlett

Photograph courtesy of Stephanie Bartlett

In March 2021, the Alberta UCP Government launched the controversial draft K-6 curriculum. The UCP government has been widely criticized for not properly consulting curriculum experts, teachers, and scholars in the development of this curriculum, causing public backlash from teachers, scholars, parents, and students. The attempts of experts to share their concerns when the draft was leaked in October 2020, especially the recommendations to incorporate Indigenous wisdom and ways of knowing, were not added into this current draft. …


Mark T. S. Currie

Photograph “Democratic participation for a better world”, courtesy of Mark T. S. Currie

I’m going to start with my main claim: teaching democracy requires teaching antiracism. The first question to ask is, what is democracy? The right to vote? Yes. The right to free speech? Sure, although this shouldn’t be thought of as speech with freedom from consequences. I won’t go through every right that would be expected in a democratic society, but will suggest that while rights are core to a democracy, what a democracy is and how it works goes beyond this. Teaching democracy, then, is more than just teaching students about the levels and structures of…


Tanjin Ashraf

As we are continuing to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic, I have been reflecting on the impact the pandemic has, and continues to have, on K-12 students. According to UNESCO’s (2021) most recent numbers, 26 countries closed their schools since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 as a pandemic, and over 144 million students have been impacted by those closures. One particular aspect I have been ruminating about is the impact the pandemic has had on students’ social capital.

Social capital consists of a depth and breadth of formal and informal networks including family, school, neighbourhood communities such as…


Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Suzanne Windsor-Liscombe

Bullying is not exclusive. It is in fact akin to a virus, looking to include everyone, thus giving credence to its actions: a “we” movement of the worst kind. Bullying is clever and sly, and often hidden. And there are many spaces within a school in which to grow the bullying virus.

From the small rectangular space of one’s desk to a group standing in a hallway to a gymnasium to an outdoor expanse: the bullying virus seeks its prey in the school’s myriad spaces.

Before proceeding, a reminder that bullies often carry a history of being bullied…


Why the Western Education System has to Change and What it Might Take to (Re) Imagine New Possibilities

Stephanie Bartlett

Photograph courtesy of Greg Rosenke, Unsplash.com

I am going to put something out there that may be uncomfortable for some: schools are places of exclusion and this won’t change until we see the world beyond the structures of fixed lines and boundaries and borders. Colonialism (reinforced by the education system) has created a society that centres humans, globalization, and resource extraction. Centring Indigenous knowledge systems in education offers possibilities to (re)imagine educational experiences and hopefully care for the earth in different ways.

Some might say that moss grows faster than change can happen in schools. There have been numerous attempts at educational reform, but…

JCACS Musings

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